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Settlements Guide for Fallout 4. This is a primer for how to get the most out of your Settlements. If planned properly, settlements can be a very lucrative venture for players to spend time in. Familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of Settlements and Crafting. Read through those sections of the wiki first for a basic understanding of things like a Workshop, Structures, Resources and more. All of those elements are the building blocks and in this guide we will explore how to put them all together.

As this is an organic and ever evolving guide, everyone should feel free to edit in their own suggestions.

Settlements Guide


Beginning Settlements Concepts


Rad Resist.png If you're interested in putting some significant work into exploring settlement building in Fallout 4, there are a few basics first. And while any build can have some fun with settlements, be aware that Charisma and Intelligence based builds have a lot more tools at their disposal early on. If you plan to build a network of settlements, having 6 in Charisma for the Local Leader Perk is a must. But again, this is not a gamebreaker if you're already deep into your playthrough.

Rad Resist.png Do some spring cleaning, it's about 200 years overdue! Scavenge your settlement so that it is free from debris like Ruined Houses, Mailboxes, Cars and more. Not only will it make your new real estate empire look more tidy, it's a great way to scavenge Materials you need to begin constructing more useful Structures and stuff your settlers need to thrive. Just walk around your settlement in Workshop mode and look around you. Things that can be scavenged or stored will be highlighted. Anything that can be scavenged will be highlighted in orange, anything that can be scavenged or stored will be highlighted in green.

Rad Resist.png You can also move objects around in Workshop view mode, so if you're planning on doing a lot of Crafting, it may be a good idea to move all your stations and workbenches within close proximity of each other to minimize running back and forth. Just select a highlighted object with X/A and relocate it wherever you'd like.


Providing Power


Rad Resist.png Put a Generator along one side of the house. Then create a "power pylon" from Connectors and Switches somewhere close to the walls of the room you wish to power. Press Y/Triangle to connect a wire between the two. At this point, your power pylon now has an AOE energy charge. From this point on, if you put lamps, TVs, or lights inside the room (basically only a wall separates your pylon from the inside), they will draw current from the pylon almost as if it was a wireless device. It has a range of around 5-7 meters.

Rad Resist.png If you wish to continue powering the house, create a "conduit" from the Power options. It's a small device that you can place either facing out from a wall, or hanging from a ceiling. Run this around 15 feet from your pylon and attach it to the outside of the house somewhere, then again, connect a wire between the pylon and the conduit. Essentially it's like an extension cord for the pylon's range, allowing you to power the next room down the line. The conduit takes fewer materials to build, so you can string them all around the house if you wish (but this would require a bigger genny).

Rad Resist.png Pro tip: If you want to test the existing range when you first place these items, just carry a TV set around with you. It will light up the screen as soon as you hit the AOE. If your light is in range it will light up as soon as you attach it to a wall and ceiling. Sometimes a new conduit isn't required; just move your light or appliance a few feet to one side.

Rad Resist.png You can attach several generators to a single Power Pylon to increase the power of that pylon. For example, if three medium-generators (5 power units each) are attached to a single pylon, the power value of that pylon would be the sum of the power values of the generators (15 power units in this case).
In larger settlements, you can build a Generator Room with a large Power Pylon on top of it. For better management and well, the generators are so loud!


Assigning Jobs


Rad Resist.png Another aspect of settlement building is assigning jobs. When you put in crops and build defense posts, someone has to be assigned before the stat takes effect. If you put down a half dozen Tato plants, while in the building menu, look at a settler and press X/A to give them a command, then walk over to the plants and press the button again. It takes a second or two, but will say that the "task has been assigned". To double check, just look at the plant while in build mode. The "person" icon should be green, not red. I also discovered there is a handy way to see what any given settler's current assignment is. While in build mode, look at them so they have a green outline, and a task nearby should also turn green without you looking at it. For instance, I put a settler on a scavenging station, and did this when they were at least thirty feet away from it - the specific station turned green as well. I was able to assign a settler to a single scavenging station, but they seem to be able to cover two guard posts as long as they're close to each other.

Rad Resist.png Having trouble remembering who is assigned to what? Try equipping "uniforms" on your settlers specific to their tasks. Guard attire for guards, farm clothing for your crop workers, etc. Or give each job a certain hat.

Rad Resist.png Highlighting a settler (that is: holding your crosshair on a settler) will highlight everything assigned to him/her. For better managements, you can build a bell that calls settlers around it. You can better define jobs for the settlers this way.


Attracting Settlers


Rad Resist.png Something I should mention is that in order to get settlements rolling you need to attract other people. This happens is if you build a radio beacon tower to send out a message across the wasteland. Unfortunately, one of the items required is hard to find - crystal. You need two units. Cameras are a good source. As soon as you find a crystal, make sure to tag it in your inventory so it shows up when you explore (also, pick up a lot of anything that has ceramic, like mugs and ashtrays, and copper, such as light bulbs and other electronics - you need a lot of this to create powered items).

Rad Resist.png Once the settlers start coming in, make sure you have 3 or 4 extra beds built at any given time, or else they'll move on. Just put them inside empty houses, or build some shacks. Make sure your food production always exceeds your population, and set up a water purifier down by the water in Sanctuary. Lastly, defense is important. Turrets cost more to build, but provide a lot of defense. In your settlement list on the pip boy, if any one place has an exclamation warning, that means this resource is lacking. I thought I had good defense, but it showed up as being a problem, so don't neglect it unless you want to return and find there's been a lot of raping and pillaging. Keep piling up turrets until the warning goes away.

Rad Resist.png Having a growing settlement can also have another benefit: traveling merchants. If you get yours going, then travel the road south out of Concord, you may see Trashcan Carla. Talk to her, buy a few things, and she'll start visiting your town regularly with supplies.


Advanced Settlements Concepts



Setting Up Trade Networks


Rad Resist.png Trade networks are a good idea if you want to build good settlements, as it allows them to share resources.

Rad Resist.png In order to establish a trade network you must have at least Charisma level 6, the local leader perk (rank 1), and a minimum of two settlements. Additionally you`ll need to assign a settler to that task. Make sure he/she is not assigned to do any other job, since they will no longer be able to do it! After selecting the settler in the workshop mode, an option will appear in the bottom to setup the supply line. Use that command, then the map section of the Pipboy will appear, where you can choose which settlements to connect. After a few ingame hours it´ll be up and running by itself. You can see which settlements are connected by checking the map and activating the "view trade routes" option. It might be a good idea to connect all your settlements in a circular trade route if possible.


Defending Your Settlements


Rad Resist.png Be on the look out at later times for Synth infiltration of your Settlements. A sudden unexplained drop in happiness may indicate the presence of syths. Pay close attention to new settlers as they come in and be on the look out for synth weapons. You may also scan your settlers in VATS searching for high energy resistance. If missed, they may begin to murder your population from the inside, similar to the Afflicted Beggar in Bloodborne .

Rad Resist.png A good rule of thumb for defense is to erect enough defensive structures to set your defense value to equal or greater than your food and water production value combined. So if your Food is at 10 and your Water is at 10, aim for a Defense of 20.

Rad Resist.png Set up defensive positions at key locations within your community, especially at entrances. Think defensively and try to anticipate enemy movements. Setting up chokepoints where you can funnel enemies will allow your settlers to concentrate their fire as opposed to an all out skirmish.


Creating a Lucrative Economy


Rad Resist.png Setting up a series of water purifiers in a settlement that resides near a body of water is an effective way of generating caps income by selling the Purified Water you obtain as a result.

Rad Resist.png Plant Corn, Tato, and Mutfruit. You can combine these with Purified Water at a Food Crafting station to create Vegetable Starch (yields 5 adhesive). You can find these ingredients most quickly at Graygarden or plant them in any settlement.


Achieving 100% Happiness


Rad Resist.png Have 1 Food for each person in your settlement. Each 6 plants can be attended by 1 Settler, who needs to be manually assigned in the Workshop. Mutfruit works the bests as they give 1 food. All other plants give 0.5.

Rad Resist.png Make sure you have enough water. You don't need water purifiers, simply enough for your people. This is rather easy to do.

Rad Resist.png Make sure you have enough beds per person. You can only have as many settlers in your Settlements as you have (10 + CHA). Supposedly wearing Armor with CHA will affect this value, but I haven't verified it. (you will need somewhere around 17 people to be considered a "large settlement".

Rad Resist.png Make sure you have enough Defense. Turrets work best as they are cheap and easy and don't require settler to man them.

Rad Resist.png Power is not a requirement for happiness. Just make sure you have enough to power up what you need

Rad Resist.png You will need about 15 tier 3 Stores. These are about 1800 Caps each and will need one settler each to run them. It doesn't matter which tier 3 shops you build (as far as I can tell) as long as you build a LOT of them. So build ones you meet the requirements for.

Rad Resist.png Miscellaneous notes. 1) Apparently dogs increase happiness, so if you can purchase one from merchants do so, 2) If you have works who won't work, send them to a different Settlement, 3) you can send settlers from other Settlements to the one you are working on, 4) spend time in your Settlement(s).

Rad Resist.png This is a long process. Happiness raises extremely slowly. Sleeping at your Settlement for long periods can help increase it faster if you have done all the things above.


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